A Short History of Jewish Tax Revolt

empty pocketBy Rabbi Jack Zimmerman,
Jewish Voice Staff Evangelist

In part-three of this fascinating six-part series about the controversy surrounding paying taxes to Caesar in biblical times, Rabbi Jack takes us on a tour of Jewish history to explain why the teachers of the law in the New Testament were so concerned with Yeshua’s (Jesus’) answer about paying taxes.

If you wanted the Jewish people to revolt back in Bible times, just talk about raising their taxes.

During the three hundred years between the rebellion of the Maccabees (164 B.C.) and the Bar Koch rebellion (132 A.D.), there were 62 rebellions by the Jewish People. And every one of those rebellions started over the issue of taxes.

Sixty-one of those rebellions that started over the issue of taxes started in the region of Galilee. Yeshua just happens to be from Galilee. Now you know why the priests were getting so worried.Watch Jack on YouTube:

More than anything else the Jews hated about Rome, on the top of the list was paying taxes. The taxes were outrageous. Rome had a total of 12 to 13 taxes.

Not every individual had to pay all 12 or 13, but there was one tax that everybody had to pay. It was called a head tax, or a poll tax. The fact that you existed and took of space meant you would have to pay a tax for that. No one was exempt. Rome charged that tax to everybody.

Jewish Voice Ministries International

Book Rabbi Jack to talk to your church or congregation. Here’s our Speaker’s Schedule to find out when Jack is available. Also, if you want to know when the key Jewish holidays are, check out these Jewish Voice speaking dates.

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Rabbi Jack’s Paying Taxes in Yeshua’s Day Blog Series:

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